Half of adults are determined to change the way they live as a consequence of Covid-19 – by developing closer bonds with neighbours, supporting small businesses and giving to those less fortunate.

A study of 2,000 Brits found 56 per cent are re-evaluating everything about their lives, with 47 per cent consciously choosing to value the smaller things in life.

A further 52 per cent believe the pandemic has made them appreciate the work of the local community and charities, and a fifth have also connected with a new charitable cause as a result.

More than a quarter of adults have volunteered for a particular charity during the pandemic, with one in 10 doing so for the first time.

Other ways adults have made positive changes include improving their work-life balance, exercising more and taking better care of their health in general.

The research was commissioned by Remember A Charity to mark Remember A Charity week from 7th-13th September – an annual awareness week that encourages people to leave a gift to charity in their will once friends and family are taken care of.

Figures show legacy giving is now worth more than £3 billion to the charity sector, helping to fund a third of Cancer Research UK research work and six in 10 RNLI lifeboats.

Rob Cope, director of Remember A Charity, said: “Our research clearly shows that recent events have made many of us re-assess our lives, priorities and values and what we consider as important.

“Our communities and charities across the UK have provided us with plenty of support throughout this challenging period; and likewise, are struggling themselves.

“To look after our communities and future generations, it’s important to help safeguard our charities and the incredible work that they do.

“One way is by leaving a gift to charity in your will once family and friends have been taken care of.

“It’s a fantastic way to create your own personal legacy and pass on something wonderful. Even a small amount can make a huge difference.”

The study also found four in 10 adults have a growing appreciation for their local area, while nearly half now recognise the importance of natural and rural places around them.

And more than a third are supporting small businesses by spending locally.

Almost four in 10 believe the pandemic has shone a light on how fortunate they are, making them want to change how they live and give back to those who aren’t as fortunate.

In fact, two-thirds have continued to make donations to good causes close to their heart, according to the OnePoll research.

A further three in 10 have looked into ways they can support those in need, with more than a fifth connecting to a new charitable cause during their time at home.

It also emerged two-fifths worry about how their children will remember them once they’ve passed.

As a result, 47 per cent of the nation want to be remembered for being charitable and supporting a cause they are passionate about – a seven per cent increase from the pre-Covid era in 2019.

Almost half (47 per cent) want to be remembered as being caring while 43 per cent want to be thought of as generous – a five per cent rise from last year.

As part of Remember A Charity Week, the consortium has teamed up with iconic British TV show The Wombles as part of their awareness week campaign – known for the way they support each other and the wider community.

Fronted by renowned television presenter, actor and the first voice artist announced for the new look Wombles, Ross King MBE, the new short animated film at www.rememberacharity.org.uk  shines a light on legacy giving.

Rob Cope, director of Remember A Charity, added: “Over the last 20 years we’ve seen an incredible number of people choosing to leave a portion of their estate to their favourite charity in their Will, which is wonderful to see.

“We’re a charitable nation and it’d make an enormous difference if the numbers of people choosing to leave a charitable gift in their Will continues to rise.”

ENDS

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