Students are asking for ‘practical’ presents this Christmas as the cost-of-living crisis bites, including electric blankets, money towards energy bills and even toilet roll.
A poll of 1,000 undergraduates found they would much prefer everyday essentials rather than designer clothes and shoes this year.
And with 51 per cent feeling the pinch of the cost-of-living crisis, 49 per cent would rather have shampoo and tins of food bought for them, so they don’t spend the money on it themselves.
Others intend to ask loved ones to gift them underwear, bath products and hot water bottles.
However, 33 per cent are still hoping for an average of four expensive gifts from their parents this Christmas.
Alex Gallagher, chief strategy officer at UNiDAYS, which commissioned the research, said: “Priorities are changing for many students this year.
“With prices rising, asking for those more practical presents for Christmas provides students with financial peace of mind – as they won’t have to fork out for essential items themselves.
“Money is understandably tight, so it’s important that we help support cash-strapped students and give back to them over the festive season, so they can have the best experience possible.
“To help, we are sharing ‘Affordable Gift Guides’ on Instagram so members can get the best offers for their most-shopped Christmas categories – from electronics to clothing.”
Students are feeling the financial squeeze
The study also found a quarter of students plan to buy fewer presents for their friends and family this year compared to last.
And while 38 per cent feel relieved at the thought of buying less, 37 per cent feel sad about it, while 25 per cent feel embarrassed.
But 31 per cent have had to be more frugal with their spending since the cost of living crisis, with 47 per cent dreading Christmas because they don’t know how they’re going to afford it.
As a

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