Women in low-income households are less likely to receive preventative health care, while those in daily pain are more likely to give up work as a result of their ailments.
A study of 10,650 females in the UK found those with a combined household income of up to £25,000 per annum are less health literate and are less likely to attend health screenings or vaccination invitations.
In fact, one in 10 have never had health issues such as blood pressure or cervical cancer checked, compared to just five per cent of those in a household earning more than £40,000 per annum.
With 15 per cent of lower earners who do not take up offers of preventative healthcare feeling it’s not needed.
They are also the least able to talk to and understand healthcare professionals (72 per cent, compared to 81 per cent of high-income households) and least likely to know where to access health information (79 per cent compared to 89 per cent of high-income households).
Although 75 per cent feel informed about what is needed to be healthy, this rises to 88 per cent of those in high-income households.
It also emerged 30 per cent of low earners who experience daily pain, such as joint pain, backaches or headaches, have stopped work completely as a result, compared to just 10 per cent of high-income households.
The study was commissioned by Hologic, an innovator in women’s health, which has also launched year two of its Global Women’s Health Index in partnership with analytics firm, Gallup.
It aims to capture the experiences of women when it comes to women’s health, covering preventive care, basic needs, opinions of health and safety, individual health and emotional health in a bid to help fill a critical gap in what the world knows about the health and well-being of the world’s women and

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