Swimming can be the best sport to relieve stress while walking could clear a mental block, according to experts.
TV personality and GP Dr Zoe Williams has recommended movements you can undertake to help improve certain moods.
She advises getting some fresh air by walking if you are having a mental block or feel unmotivated can help give you a boost, as this helps your heart to beat faster – providing fresh oxygenated blood to your brain, allowing you to think and focus better.
While the methodical movement of swimming gives you something to focus your mind on, helping to reduce stress levels, as well as releasing cortisol which can help to manage stress.
But dancing can be used as a way of quashing feelings of worry or anxiety as the physical activity can release endorphins, serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline, which give you feelings of happiness.
Improving wellbeing
The advice comes after research of 3,000 adults, including 1,000 who have a long-term health condition, found 67 per cent of those who do some form of physical activity claim it helps their mood.
While 32 per cent feel their mood is lower if they don’t move or exercise as much as they usually would, with mental wellbeing the biggest factor for 18 per cent when choosing a physical activity.
However, for those with a long-term health condition, 38 per cent who do some form of physical activity believe it helps their wellbeing, with 23 per cent claiming the impact it has on their mental health is their top consideration.
Not moving as much as they would like causes 45 per cent of those with a long-term health condition to feel low, compared to 27 per cent of those living without a condition.
Dr Zoe Williams, who is working with We Are Undefeatable, which commissioned the research, said: “It can be frustrating

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